Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

The Evolution of the Social Web

June 1, 2011 Leave a comment

[tweetmeme source=”tmiesen” only_single=false]

Email wasn’t first social phenomenon the internet brought to the world, but it was the first to break through to the masses. It is behind the curtains; you have to be invited into a conversation. Maybe the person on the other end is a parent, maybe it’s a coworker, maybe it’s a friend. Email is a less urgent telephone call.

Then, Facebook arrived. It’s a safe way for long-lost lovers, could-have-beens, and just-missed-the-moments to reconnect and say all the things they wish they said years ago, when they were in their prime. It’s a time machine.

Facebook is also a way for college kids to get to know each other without really getting to know each other. Facebook is an avenue for you to spit out tiny bits of trivia about yourself: you like this movie, these are your favorite quotes. Here are a few pictures you’ve hand-selected that define you. It is you, but always the best side of you.

Before you know it, a few pokes back and forth with that girl you may or may not have met on Facebook turns into a wall conversation, which turns into going out together, and so on. Facebook is the most socially acceptable form of online dating we have. It is your past, present and future all rolled-up into one package.

Status updates brought Twitter to the party, where someone (or anyone) can get a quick snapshot of what you are thinking or feeling right now. It’s a way to share what you find interesting. It is a reassurance that you can shout out to the vast emptiness of the internet and know that someone, somewhere, is probably listening.

Twitter is an avenue for serendipitous social connections. It is far better than Facebook at cultivating a spontaneous, sometimes meaningful relationship with another person, regardless of where that person is physically located. It is the movie “Crash,” translated into ones and zeros and available to anyone with an internet connection.

Then came Foursquare. If people care what you had for lunch and what you’re thinking right now, then they’ll probably care about where you are right now, right? Foursquare rewards movement, going new places, and traveling in large crowds. Through Foursquare, the internet turns your world into the Oregon Trail.

And then there’s Instagram, one of the newer portals we have. If everyone cares what you’re doing right now and where you’re doing it, then surely they’ll want to see it through your eyes. Instagram is as close as an outsider can presently get to feeling what you feel .  Instagram lets you easily and wordlessly show the world things you have created that you judge to be interesting and beautiful.

The one pattern I can pull from this timeline is how much more personal everything is getting. If you started out with email, you were having one-on-one conversations with a previously established connection. Facebook allowed you to share tiny, trivial bits of yourself with others and has since turned into a five, ten, or fifty year reunion. Twitter and Foursquare convinced you that the world cares about where you are right now and what you’re thinking. Instagram invites others to see the uniqueness and beauty of the world like you do.

The social web is getting more personal, more intimate. Piece by piece, you are shedding your protection. You are standing naked in front of millions of people, so to speak. I think that’s interesting, and it makes me intrigued by what the future brings.

Advertisements

Fixing Foursquare

September 23, 2010 2 comments

[tweetmeme source=”tmiesen” only_single=false]

Over the summer, my friends and I loved using Foursquare. When we started checking-in, it was so fun to unlock badges and claim mayorships. It was a game that we played against each other. On very rare occasions, we actually received special treatment for being mayors and using the location-based service. It was super fun. But it’s not so fun anymore.

There’s a plateau. If you’re in a city like Madison, Wisconsin, there are only so many rewards you can get and so many things to do. Once you unlock these 10 or so badges, you can’t go any further. Location-based social media needs to evolve past mayorships to fight off Foursquare fatigue.

Go Local

It’ time for Foursquare to become more localized. They’re heading in the right direction with Foursquare for Universities, which was just launched last week. Essentially, Foursquare is selecting ambassadors to create a more personal, local connection with the college towns. This could be used in so many cool ways. It’s already being used for university tours, which helps smartphone clutching freshmen navigate a new campus (kids these days….).

Schools are able to create specialized badges for different campus hot-spots. I bet that students will love this. Anyone from Madison would appreciate getting a “Badger Badge” for attending a certain amount of UW sporting events, for example. Increasing the relevancy of badges for each University would keep college kids (and the adults that hang out on campus) more interested.

Even in the suburbs, there are interesting, badge-worthy things to do. I currently live within biking distance of the Minnesota Zoo, for example….it’s easy enough to make an “In the Wild” badge. The point is this: the more personal and specialized Foursquare feels to the user, the more a person is likely to use it.

Beyond Mayorships

It’s time to look beyond specials for just the mayor. Foursquare 2.0 for the iPhone was released this week, and it emphasizes the “Tips” and “To-Do” sections of the app. On the old interface, the hope was that people would leave friendly tips and comments about the place. Foursquare 2.0 also allows you to find to-do’s on the internet and add them to your Foursquare account as a reminder to go to that place or accomplish that to-do. Here, the possibilities for use are endless.

Businesses can create Tips/To-Dos that entice a patron to do something in exchange for a deal. Think about how word-of-mouth would spread if someone had to do a dance in the middle of a restaurant for a free meal, or you received a free appetizer if you brought in a crowd of 10. It will be cool to read a positive restaurant review online and then be able to “tag” that place, so you know where to go. Or, a business could put the “Add this to Foursquare” button on their website and create quick, mobile coupons. The “Add to Foursquare” button could be a really great tool for businesses to increase new visits and return customers.

Quick ideas

There are a ton of other things Foursquare can do to make sure its service stays fun and relevant to users. Here’s a quick list of ideas I’m stealing from other LBS services that would heighten the Foursquare experience:

  • Like Facebook Places, integrate other information about the venue. Link directly to the place’s webpage, put reviews up, and tie in the venue’s social media, if applicable.
  • Like SCVNGR, integrate “games” and “tasks.” Create scavenger hunts and other fun things to do. Give the user an incentive (even if it is just “fun”) to continue to use the service.
  • Allow users to pin photographs to the places.
  • Continue to partner with businesses, and work with group-buying companies like Groupon.
  • Foursquare is beginning to recommend places to go to. This one is a little touchy because people don’t like being told what to do, but imagine how useful this could be to travelers or people moving to new cities.

So, what does the future look like?

Like I said in a previous post, the possibilities for Foursquare are really endless. What we’re continuing to see in today’s world is a shift to a cross-platform experience; something you do or look at on the internet can be transferred seamlessly to your mobile phone. This is what Foursquare 2.0 is doing with its “Add this to Foursquare” buttons. It will be really cool to see how technology like this continues to grow in the future to create a better experience for consumers.

As location-based social media continues to become more mainstream and the options for which service to use become more numerous, Foursquare is going to have to continue to evolve in order to cater to the users’ needs. Hopefully, Foursquare and other services like it keep listening to what the consumers want so that location-based social media is still fun and relevant. I’ll keep checking-in as long as it remains fun and I get something out of it.

Tired of Foursquare too? How else could they keep it fun?

Building Your Personal Brand Without Selling Your Soul

September 8, 2010 2 comments

[tweetmeme source=”tmiesen” only_single=false]

Sad Don Draper has a personal branding problem

A few years ago, “personal branding” was one of those phrases that made me hate that I was in Business School. I always saw it as a gimmick to avoid, a game I wouldn’t play along with, and an idea I could never believe in. I don’t want to be a person with a catchphrase, and I’m not the type of person to rely on some false trait in order to advance my career. However, I’ve learned that personal branding isn’t so bad as long as you remember that you can be yourself and still succeed.

You’re the product

Whether you’re going for a job, or trying to get in a relationship, or applying for school, you’re essentially selling yourself. That’s what personal branding is about. Whether you like it or not, you are a product, and your attributes and abilities have to be attractive to the company you are trying to work for (the “buyer”). You do this by finding out how to differentiate yourself from all of the other brands out there vying for the buyer’s attention, and by promoting the best aspects of your “brand.”  Hopefully, you do this well enough that someone wants to hire you, or go on a date, or accept you into their school program. If this sounds impersonal, good. It’s supposed to. This is where you can inject some of your personality.

Blend personal and professional

One of the questions I come across fairly frequently as I’m reading things online is “should I have separate Twitter accounts for my friends and professional life?” I don’t believe that you have to separate your personal and professional identity to get a job. The way I see it, my personality is one of the most identifiable differentiators my personal brand has; I WANT people to see more than my “professional side.” There are hundreds of college grads from UW-Madison that have my credentials, but there’s only one person like me (and this is coming from someone who has an identical twin). If an employer has an issue with me tweeting about anything “off-topic” or showing off my personal side, then I probably wouldn’t be a good fit in their company anyways, and I sure as hell don’t want to work in a place where I don’t fit. Simple as that.

Of course, there are limits. You have to be mindful of the things you post online and the pictures you show up in. This doesn’t mean you have to untag every picture of you with a red Solo cup, or take every damn, hell, and ass out of your online lexicon.  Have fun online. Just understand that the internet is a public forum, and be careful.  As long as you’re comfortable with whatever you’re posting, you’ll probably be alright.

Oh, Lord. Networking

Networking is a word that evokes fire and brimstone to me. A place of slick hair and slicker pitches. A world of opportunistic people exchanging firm handshakes and elevator speeches. People donning their best suits and going to events solely to lie and pass out business cards. The opposite of authentic, the perpetual job fair.  My own personal hell. But networking doesn’t have to be so bad.

It helps to remember that people aren’t usually that cold, and many actually feel the same way about networking. If you like having conversations with people, just think of networking as talking with a bunch of people interested in having a conversation. Pretend you’re at a bar; even though you’re at a business event, you can still talk about other things like popular culture, sports, and music. Try to make some new friends, and who knows, maybe they’ll be good people to know in the business world too. Maybe your personal brand is attractive to a recruiter simply because you’re not all business, all the time. Maybe, just maybe, being yourself will land you a job.

In the end, just be yourself

“Personal branding” was such a strange concept to me because I didn’t understand how easy it is. You don’t have to buy in to all of the gimmicks, or be fake, or pretend to be something you’re not. All you have to do is be yourself, and your personality will become your “personal brand.” Some people may not like your brand and they may not want to buy your product, but that’s alright. That’s why you don’t see a 40 year-old businessman browsing through the Slayer tees at Hot Topic and why you don’t see Donald Trump at Walmart.  Square pegs don’t fit into round holes, so don’t waste your time chasing an employer who doesn’t like you for who you are.

(Photo via)

What do you think about personal branding? How about networking?

Crowdsourcing in the Idea Mosh-Pit

August 18, 2010 1 comment

[tweetmeme source=”tmiesen” only_single=false]

Sometimes, the internet reinforces my belief in humanity because of the vast amount of creative energy and raw intelligence that I see while surfing. Everywhere I look, there’s an idea being hashed out, a hilariously unexpected joke created, and something new being created. There are people with great ideas all over the internet, but the only place they are able to express these ideas is in the comments section of blogs or on their own blogs and social media accounts.

Advertisers and creative think-tanks are providing a new arena in which people can let their creative juices flow: crowdsourcing.

Regardless of what you call it (apparently it’s now called “creative collaboration”), crowdsourcing aims to take the creative energy of the masses and focus it on brainstorming, innovation, and other projects. Think of it as mass freelancing with even less commitment. Basically, crowdsourcing is outsourcing a project to a large amount of people through an open invitation to collaborate (often on the internet). Crowdsourcing is a major trend in advertising and marketing, and I think it can be beneficial for both parties. Here’s how.

Agencies

Crowdsourcing can be a valuable and worthwhile practice for agencies. Don’t believe me? Here’s a snippet from the website of a crowdsourcing ad agency in Boulder, Victors and Spoils:

“Current factors such as radical transparency, the consumer’s demand to be more involved and a growing cost consciousness regarding clients’ budgets have all made crowdsourcing especially timely for today’s marketers”

Let’s touch on each one of those points:

-Radical transparency, as I’ve talked about before, is really popular with my generation. We as consumers want to know what is going on with the brands we buy. What’s more transparent than consumers actually having a part in creating the ad? Brands can gain consumer’s trust by using crowdsourcing principles.

-Because we want greater transparency, we want to be involved. Consumers just like to have a say in things. Just look at how many people vote for the next American Idol every year. People want to participate. Again, this allows the ad agency and brand to gain the trust of the public.

-There’s a famous quote: “Half of all advertising is wasted, I just don’t know which half.” These days, it’s even harder to determine the return on investment of your advertising (though there’s a surplus of “experts” out there who can do it for you). This makes clients even more wary of spending their money on advertising.

Individuals

Crowdsourcing can also be beneficial for people wishing to get their ideas out there. As I said before, people just want to participate and help out. Crowdsourcing allows individuals to let their voices be heard. Here are some other reasons why I think the masses want to join in:

Foot-in-the-door: It’s a tough job market out there. Anything an individual can do to stand above the clutter is great; your chances of being noticed in the ad community would definitely increase if you showed off some of your work in a crowdsourcing contest.

Practice: Participating in crowdsourcing also allows you to hone your creative skills. If you join in, you can work on many different projects; use this to your advantage. Play around with different writing/design skills; you know you can’t get fired, so you can really go big or go home. Practice working on real brands and products with real briefs is important, so you should take any opportunity you can to hone your craft.

Rewards: Sometimes, brands will crowdsource ideas through a contest. Netflix did this about a year ago when they wanted a new recommendation algorithm. The prize was $1,000,000! Crowdsourcing can be quite lucrative for the winners of these contests. Even if you don’t win, you still get some practice in your field and some notoriety in your industry for trying.

Counterpoint

Of course, there are going to be some horror stories. Vegemite tried to crowdsource a new name, and the crowd picked “iSnack 2.0” as the new name (seriously). Agencies can’t let the crowd do everything; copywriters and art directors are hired for a reason, and many in the crowd simply aren’t as good as agency staff. Crowdsourcing is great for brainstorming new concepts, ideas, and rough drafts, but agencies probably shouldn’t crowdsource an entire project. Brands still want an agency’s expertise.

Crowdsourcing obviously isn’t the solution to every brand’s problem, but it is an interesting new way to think about innovation and brainstorming. Once we learn how to effectively tap into the internet for ideas and we learn how to incentivize those participating in crowdsourcing, I see it becoming an even bigger trend. Ideas are all around us; it’s just up to us to find out how to use them.

What do you think? Is crowdsourcing worth it? I’d love to hear your responses.

(Photo via)

%d bloggers like this: